Musicality – Daisy Buckët, Calum Scott, Logic, Halsey

 

Daisy Buckët

Pansy

This independent album by Kansas City’s very own drag icon Daisy Buckët is an absolute blast from beginning to end. It’s a mix of interesting covers and some excellent originals from Daisy, who also performs internationally with the Kinsey Sicks, known as America’s Favorite Dragapella Beautyshop Quartet. Two tracks feature the popular Kansas City band called The Philistines, and it’s a true romance between these two. The album mostly features varying styles of jazz and lounge, but there are some surprises peppered in. One of my favorite tracks is “Balls of Brass,” which, at its core, is a classic rap song. Yes, Daisy can rap, and she throws in some love for Kansas City. I was slapped in the face and awakened by “Friday Night in the Castro,” a fantastic disco dance bop from the opera I Am Harvey Milk. Daisy’s voice is razor sharp. The entire album, which shows her range, is a delight. The release date is April 10; check www.missdaisybucket.com for details.

Calum Scott  

Only Human

(Capitol Records)

This is Calum Scott’s first full-length album, and it’s stunningly beautiful. Before this powerful album release, the Britain’s Got Talent 2015 finalist was mostly known for his great cover of the Swedish singer Robyn’s “Dancing on My Own.” Lucky for us, Scott decided to ride the wave and work on his own original music after he came out as gay to his father. He’s a quickly rising star, and it’s easy to see why. His voice is so good that it would be almost paralyzing if it weren’t for the intensely catchy beats beyond the vocals. His original compositions are excellent. Scott can make you dance or make you cry. He makes me excited about pop music again. It’s hard to choose, but my favorite songs are “Come Back Home,” “Only You,” and “What I Miss Most.”

 

Logic  

Bobby Tarantino II

(Def Jam/Visionary)

This is the sixth mixtape by Logic. The last album he released, Everybody, was extremely popular, especially “1-800-273-8255,” a song featuring Alessia Cara and Khalid that offers a powerful message about clinging to life when thoughts of suicide come up. The biggest difference between Logic’s albums and his mixtapes is their tone. His mixtapes have some rougher edges and some harder raps. This one is excellent. Sure, the rap is a bit more hardcore, but the melodies are incredible. Logic teams up on these tracks with some big names, such as Wiz Khalifa, 2 Chainz, and Big Sean. My favorite tracks from the mixtape are “Midnight,” “Warm It Up – Young Sinatra,” and “Everyday.”

 

Halsey  

Hopeless Fountain Kingdom

(Astralwerks)

Somehow, I’ve accidentally managed to avoid Halsey during her rise. Now that I’ve listened to this album, I know that’s been a mistake. Halsey wrote and delivered a poem about sexual abuse in January at the 2018 Women’s March in New York. The poem reached into the hearts and minds of thousands, me included, and I knew I couldn’t ignore this artist for a second longer. Her latest album, from last year, is Hopeless Fountain Kingdom, and it’s wonderful throughout. Halsey is a strong pop singer, but her lyrics carry much more depth. Underneath, it seems she’s a poet disguised as a pop star – a lyricist at her core. My favorite songs are “Heaven in Hiding,” “Alone,” and “Bad at Love.”